Supporting Scripture: Nehemiah 2:18 (ESV)

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Have you ever worked on a building project?

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Supporting Scripture: Nehemiah 1:11 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Nehemiah 2:4-6 (ESV)

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Our plans motivated by will always be to what God’s plans are.

Supporting Scripture: Nehemiah 2:19 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Nehemiah 3:1-2 (ESV)

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How is God calling you to rise and build?

 

Here are some personal reflection questions based on Nehemiah 2:17-20, which is about rebuilding Jerusalem’s walls for God’s glory:

  1. Vision and Passion:
    • How did Nehemiah’s vision for rebuilding Jerusalem’s walls inspire the people around him?
    • What are some ways you can cultivate a vision that aligns with God’s purposes in your own life or community?
  2. Overcoming Opposition:
    • What kinds of opposition did Nehemiah face, and how did he respond?
    • Reflect on a time when you faced opposition or obstacles in pursuing something for God’s glory. How did you handle it, and what did you learn from the experience?
  3. Unity and Collaboration:
    • How did Nehemiah mobilize and unite the people to work together for a common purpose?
    • In what ways can you foster unity and collaboration among others in your church or community for projects that honor God?
  4. Trusting God’s Provision:
    • Nehemiah trusted God’s provision and guidance throughout the rebuilding process. How can you cultivate a deeper trust in God’s provision in your own life?
    • Reflect on instances when you have experienced God’s provision or intervention in unexpected ways.
  5. Commitment to God’s Work:
    • Nehemiah and the people were committed to completing the task despite challenges. How can you maintain perseverance and commitment in serving God, especially when faced with difficulties?
    • What practical steps can you take to ensure that your efforts are aligned with God’s will and bring glory to Him?
  6. Impact on the Community:
    • What was the impact of rebuilding Jerusalem’s walls on the community and their relationship with God?
    • How can your actions and projects aimed at glorifying God have a positive impact on those around you?
  7. Personal Application:
    • How does the story of Nehemiah challenge you personally in terms of your own dedication to God’s work and His glory?
    • What specific steps can you take based on Nehemiah’s example to actively contribute to building God’s kingdom and glorifying Him in your daily life?

These questions can help you reflect deeply on Nehemiah’s example and apply the principles from his story to your own journey of faith and service to God.

What does freedom mean to you?

Freedom = the power or right to act, speak or think as one wants without or .

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Supporting Scripture: Galatians 5:1 (ESV)

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KOINE (KOY-NAY) – Greek

The only thing that has any bearing on your is the work Jesus did on the cross as for your sin!

Why is Paul writing this letter?

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Supporting Scripture: Acts 13:1-3 (ESV)

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Reflecting on Galatians 5:1-12 in the context of freedom can provide deep personal insights. Here are some questions to guide your reflection:

  1. Understanding Freedom in Christ:
    • What does “freedom in Christ” mean to you personally?
    • How do you experience or understand the freedom that Paul talks about in verse 1?
  2. Personal Application:
    • In what areas of your life do you feel bound or enslaved, and how can the message of Galatians 5:1-12 help you find freedom in those areas?
    • How can you live out the freedom you have in Christ in your daily life?
  3. Law vs. Grace:
    • How do you balance following religious rules or laws with living under God’s grace?
    • Are there any areas where you feel you might be relying too heavily on rules rather than embracing the freedom of grace?
  4. Community and Freedom:
    • How does your understanding of freedom in Christ affect the way you interact with others in your faith community?
    • How can you help others in your community understand and live out their freedom in Christ?
  5. Circumcision and Symbolism:
    • Paul speaks against relying on circumcision for justification. What modern-day practices might people rely on for justification, and how can you avoid these pitfalls?
    • What symbolic “circumcisions” might you need to let go of to fully embrace your freedom in Christ?
  6. Faith Expressing Itself Through Love:
    • In verse 6, Paul emphasizes faith working through love. How do you see this principle at work in your life?
    • How can you better express your faith through acts of love and service to others?
  7. Avoiding Legalism:
    • Have there been times when you have fallen into legalistic thinking? How did this affect your relationship with God and others?
    • What steps can you take to guard against legalism and embrace true freedom in Christ?
  8. Reflecting on Past Influences:
    • Paul warns against those who would lead believers away from the truth. Are there influences in your life that have led you away from the freedom in Christ?
    • How can you discern and distance yourself from such influences?
  9. Spiritual Growth:
    • How does understanding your freedom in Christ contribute to your spiritual growth?
    • What practical steps can you take to grow in your freedom and help others grow in theirs?
  10. Gratitude and Freedom:
    • How can you cultivate a sense of gratitude for the freedom you have in Christ?
    • What role does gratitude play in experiencing and sharing this freedom?

Reflecting on these questions can help deepen your understanding and application of the freedom Paul describes in Galatians 5:1-12.

 

What comes to mind when you hear the words, “the end of time”?

God provides for us in the Bible a framework for understanding the end of time.

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The framework for the end of time will be marked by: (1) great (2) great , and (3) great

Who is Daniel?

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Daniel is the prophet of the Old Testament.

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Who is speaking to Daniel in the visions he receives about the end of time?

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Supporting Scripture: Daniel 10:4-9 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Revelation 1:12-18 (ESV)

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The end of time will be marked by GREAT TRIBULATION.

Supporting Scripture: Daniel 12:1 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 24:21 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Daniel 11:36-39 (ESV)

Supporting Scripture: Daniel 11:43 (ESV)

Supporting Scripture: Daniel 11:45 (ESV)

The antichrist’s reign on earth will be marked by: (1) requiring all to from God, (2) controlling the of the (the buying and spending), (3) setting up in Jerusalem to be as a god (this is what Daniel calls the abomination that causes desolation).

Supporting Scripture: Daniel 12:11 (ESV)

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The end of time will be marked by GREAT JUDGMENT.

Supporting Scripture: Daniel 12:2 (ESV)

Supporting Scripture: Daniel 12:10 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Revelation 20:11-15 (ESV)

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The end of time will be marked by GREAT SALVATION.

Supporting Scripture: Daniel 12:1-2 (ESV)

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How do we respond to God’s truth about the end of time?

Reflecting on the end-time prophecy in Daniel 12:1-13 involves exploring themes of judgment, resurrection, wisdom, and perseverance. Here are some personal reflection questions:

Questions on Understanding and Wisdom

  1. How do you interpret the prophecy of the end times as described in Daniel 12:1-4?
    • What insights or revelations stand out to you, and how do they influence your understanding of God’s plan for the end of time?
  2. Daniel 12:3 speaks of those who are wise and lead many to righteousness. What does this imply about the role of wisdom and righteousness in the end times?
    • How can you seek to grow in wisdom and lead others towards righteousness in your daily life?

Questions on Resurrection and Eternal Life

  1. Daniel 12:2 mentions the resurrection of the dead, some to everlasting life and others to shame and everlasting contempt. How does this shape your perspective on life and death?
    • Reflect on how the promise of resurrection and eternal life influences your actions and priorities.
  2. What does the promise of everlasting life mean to you personally?
    • How does this hope affect the way you live and the choices you make?

Questions on Perseverance and Faithfulness

  1. Daniel 12:1 mentions a time of distress such as never has been seen before. How does this prepare you for potential future challenges?
    • Reflect on how you can cultivate a steadfast faith to endure times of great difficulty.
  2. How does the assurance of God’s deliverance for those written in the book encourage you to remain faithful?
    • What practical steps can you take to ensure your name is “written in the book”?

Questions on Prophetic Understanding and Patience

  1. In Daniel 12:8-9, Daniel admits he does not fully understand the vision, and he is told to go his way. How do you handle uncertainty about the future or aspects of your faith you do not fully understand?
    • Reflect on how you can trust God even when you don’t have all the answers.
  2. What does it mean to “go your way” in the context of awaiting the fulfillment of prophecy?
    • How can you live faithfully and purposefully while waiting for God’s timing?

Questions on the Role of the Believer

  1. Daniel 12:10 states that many will be purified, made spotless, and refined. How does this process of purification resonate with your spiritual journey?
    • In what ways do you feel God is purifying and refining you currently?
  2. What actions or attitudes can you adopt to be part of the group that is purified and made spotless?
    • Consider what spiritual disciplines or changes in behavior might be necessary for you to align more closely with God’s will.

Questions on Prophetic Fulfillment

  1. The prophecy includes specific periods (days) mentioned in Daniel 12:11-12. While interpretations vary, how does the concept of divine timing affect your trust in God’s plan?
    • Reflect on a time when you had to wait on God’s timing. How did it shape your faith and patience?
  2. How can you balance living in the present while being mindful of the prophetic future described in Daniel 12?
    • What practical ways can you integrate the hope and urgency of the end times into your daily life?

Questions on Final Encouragement

  1. In Daniel 12:13, Daniel is told to “go your way till the end” and that he will rest and rise to receive his allotted inheritance. How does this promise of rest and inheritance provide comfort and motivation?
    • How can you find peace and encouragement in the promise of eternal rest and reward?
  2. How does the assurance of God’s ultimate justice and the final reward for the faithful impact your current struggles and challenges?
    • Reflect on how this assurance can help you to persevere and remain faithful in difficult times.

Use these questions to delve deeper into your understanding of Daniel 12:1-13 and to reflect on how its messages and promises can shape your faith and actions.

What does it mean to be holy?

We shy away from the subject of holiness because most of us just don’t feel like we to God’s standard of holiness.

Supporting Scripture: Leviticus 11:44

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 5:48

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Supporting Scripture: Hebrews 12:14

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Holiness is not perfection that comes me. Holiness is Christ me.

“Gospel holiness is no less than the image of God stamped upon the heart; it is no other than the whole mind which was in Christ Jesus.” – John Wesley from the sermon, New Birth

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Supporting Scripture: Romans 8:1-4

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Supporting Scripture: Romans 8:10-13

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Holiness is living from the , not the

Supporting Scripture: Matthew 23:25-28

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“Most people think of holiness as walking around wearing a pair of white skinny jeans.” – Miriam Swafford

“Holiness is more like wearing that pair of white skinny jeans knowing that you have the bleaching agent which will wash away all stains.” – Miriam Swafford

Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego are the perfect example of what it means to live from the inside-out.

Supporting Scripture: Daniel 1:1-4

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Supporting Scripture: Daniel 1:7

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What does this story mean for us today?

I believe what is desperately needed today are holy people who follow Jesus Christ from the inside-out.

Reflecting on Daniel 3:14-25 and the theme of holiness involves considering the actions, faith, and commitment of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, as well as God’s intervention. Here are some personal reflection questions:

Questions on Faith and Trust in God

  1. How do Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego’s responses to King Nebuchadnezzar demonstrate their faith in God?
    • Reflect on a time when your faith was tested. How did you respond, and what can you learn from their example?
  2. What does their refusal to worship the golden image, despite the threat of death, teach about trust in God over earthly powers?
    • Consider areas in your life where you might be tempted to compromise your beliefs. How can you stand firm in your faith?
  3. In what ways does their confidence in God’s ability to save them, whether He does or not, reflect a deep trust?
    • How can you develop a similar trust in God’s plans for your life, even when the outcome is uncertain?

Questions on Obedience and Commitment

  1. What does the unwavering commitment of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego to their faith say about the importance of obedience to God?
    • Are there areas in your life where you struggle with obedience to God’s commands? How can you work towards full commitment?
  2. How can their example inspire you to stay committed to your beliefs in the face of pressure or persecution?
    • Reflect on a situation where you had to choose between conforming to societal expectations and staying true to your faith. What did you learn from that experience?

Questions on Holiness

  1. How does the holiness of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego set them apart in the story?
    • Think about ways you can pursue holiness in your own life. What practical steps can you take to live a life set apart for God?
  2. What does this passage teach about the relationship between holiness and trust in God’s protection and provision?
    • Reflect on times when living a holy life has required you to trust in God’s provision. How did you experience His faithfulness?

Questions on God’s Presence and Deliverance

  1. How does God’s intervention in the fiery furnace illustrate His presence and deliverance in times of trial?
    • Recall a time when you felt God’s presence during a difficult situation. How did that experience strengthen your faith?
  2. What does the appearance of the fourth figure in the furnace (interpreted by many as a theophany or a pre-incarnate appearance of Christ) signify about God’s involvement in our suffering?
    • How can the knowledge of God’s presence in your trials bring you comfort and assurance today?
  3. In what ways does the miraculous deliverance of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego deepen your understanding of God’s power and sovereignty?
    • How does this understanding influence your daily walk with God and your confidence in His ability to handle any situation?

Questions on Witness and Influence

  1. How did the faith and deliverance of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego impact King Nebuchadnezzar and those who witnessed the event?
    • How can your faith and actions serve as a witness to those around you? Are there specific ways you can be more intentional about this?
  2. What lessons can you learn from this story about the importance of public faithfulness in influencing others towards God?
    • Reflect on your public expressions of faith. Are they consistent with your private beliefs, and how can they be a testimony to others?

Using these questions as a guide, spend time in personal reflection and prayer, asking God to reveal areas where you can grow in faith, obedience, holiness, and your witness to others.

Have you ever found yourself in a difficult place?

Supporting Scripture: Genesis 3:23-24 (ESV)

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“If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that I was made for another world.” – C.S. Lewis in Mere Christianity

Our longing has a focus: for Jesus to and make everything that we might dwell with Him in joy forever.

Supporting Scripture: 1 Peter 1:17 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: 1 Peter 2:11 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Hebrews 13:14 (ESV)

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One characteristic of a faithful exile is intimacy with Jesus.

Supporting Scripture: Jeremiah 29:1 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Jeremiah 29:4 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Jeremiah 29:12-14 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Deuteronomy 4:29-31 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: John 6:37 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Proverbs 8:17 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Jeremiah 29:5-7 (ESV)

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A second characteristic of a faithful exile is to have faith in every part of your life.

Supporting Scripture: Genesis 1:28 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Genesis 12:3 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 5:14 (ESV)

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Reflecting on Jeremiah 29:4-14, which addresses the Israelites living in exile, can provide profound insights into coping with displacement, maintaining faith, and finding purpose in challenging circumstances. Here are some personal reflection questions based on this passage:

  1. Settling in Unfamiliar Places:
    • How do you respond to being placed in an unfamiliar or uncomfortable environment?
    • What steps can you take to “build houses and settle down” (v. 5) in your current situation, making it more conducive to growth and stability?
  2. Fostering Community:
    • How can you contribute to the welfare of the community where you are currently situated, even if it feels temporary or undesired?
    • In what ways can you “seek the peace and prosperity of the city” (v. 7) where you live?
  3. Long-term Vision:
    • How do you maintain hope and a positive outlook when your desired outcomes seem far off, as the Israelites had to wait 70 years (v. 10)?
    • What long-term goals can you set for yourself that align with God’s promises and plans for you?
  4. Faith and Trust in God’s Plan:
    • How do you trust in God’s plans for you, even when you can’t see the immediate benefits or understand the reasons behind your current circumstances?
    • Reflect on times when you felt abandoned or lost. How can you use those experiences to strengthen your faith in God’s plan for your future (v. 11)?
  5. Prayer and Seeking God:
    • How often do you turn to prayer when you are in distress or facing challenges?
    • What practices can you adopt to ensure that you “call upon” God and seek Him with all your heart (v. 12-13)?
  6. Hope and Restoration:
    • What promises from God give you hope and encouragement during difficult times?
    • How can you remind yourself of God’s promise to “bring you back from captivity” and restore your fortunes (v. 14)?
  7. Personal Growth in Exile:
    • How can your current trials and hardships contribute to your personal and spiritual growth?
    • In what ways can you find meaning and purpose in your current “exile” or challenging situation?
  8. Relationship with God:
    • How does your relationship with God change when you are in a situation of exile or displacement?
    • What steps can you take to deepen your relationship with God during such times?
  9. Community and Family:
    • How can you support and build up those around you, particularly family and close friends, during times of collective hardship?
    • What role does community play in maintaining a sense of normalcy and hope during difficult times (v. 6)?
  10. Gratitude and Perspective:
    • How can you cultivate a sense of gratitude even when circumstances are tough?
    • What positive aspects of your current situation can you focus on to maintain a hopeful and optimistic perspective?

Reflecting on these questions can help you navigate the challenges of feeling exiled or dislocated while holding onto faith and finding purpose in your journey.

 

Are you hearing God’s call to go?

“God has a special, individual call for every Christ-committed layperson.” – Gus Gustafson

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We do have a , calling to Isaiah’s. It is called the .

The first parallel between Isaiah’s call and the Great Commission is a .

Isaiah’s compelling motivation was to warn and to prepare people for God’s judgment so that they might turn back to Him and repent.

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Supporting Scripture: Isaiah 1:1-5 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Isaiah 1:18-20 (ESV)

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Our compelling motivation is that Jesus is coming back to earth.

Supporting Scripture: Matthew 24:4-14 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 24:29-31 (ESV)

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The return of Jesus Christ is .

The second parallel between Isaiah’s call and the Great Commission is a strong awareness of God’s and .

Supporting Scripture: Isaiah 6:1-5 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Isaiah 6:6-7 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 28:16-18 (ESV)

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It isn’t through our righteousness, our ability, nor our authority that we fulfill our calling. It’s through the righteousness and authority of Jesus and through the ability and power of the Holy Spirit.

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The third parallel between Isaiah’s call and the Great Commission is a clear, undeniable, .

Supporting Scripture: Isaiah 6:8-9 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 28:19-20 (ESV)

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Are you willing to answer God’s call, like Isaiah, by saying, “Here I am, Send me.”

Isaiah 6:1-8 and the Great Commission (Matthew 28:18-20) both emphasize themes of divine calling, purification, and mission. Reflecting on these passages together can help deepen your understanding of your own spiritual journey and calling. Here are some personal reflection questions:

Isaiah 6:1-8

  1. Encountering God:
    • How do I respond when I feel I am in the presence of God, similar to Isaiah’s vision of the Lord?
    • What moments in my life have felt like a profound encounter with the divine?
  2. Self-Perception and Sin:
    • How do I view my own unworthiness or sinfulness in the light of God’s holiness?
    • What aspects of my life need purification or change to better serve God?
  3. Divine Cleansing:
    • Reflect on a time when you felt cleansed or forgiven by God. How did this experience transform you?
    • In what ways do I seek or resist God’s purifying work in my life?
  4. Responding to God’s Call:
    • How do I discern God’s calling in my life?
    • Am I ready to say, “Here am I; send me,” even if the task seems daunting or unclear?

Connection to the Great Commission

  1. Understanding the Mission:
    • How do I understand the Great Commission in the context of my daily life and work?
    • What does “making disciples of all nations” mean to me personally?
  2. Empowerment and Authority:
    • How do I experience the authority and presence of Christ as I go about my daily activities?
    • In what ways do I rely on Jesus’ promise to be with us always in fulfilling my mission?
  3. Sharing the Gospel:
    • How comfortable am I in sharing my faith with others? What are the challenges I face?
    • What practical steps can I take to be more effective in sharing the Good News?
  4. Teaching and Baptizing:
    • How do I engage in teaching others about Jesus and the faith?
    • What role does baptism and the sacraments play in my understanding of the Great Commission?

Integrative Reflection

  1. Personal Mission:
    • How does Isaiah’s willingness to be sent by God inspire my own sense of mission and purpose?
    • In what ways do I feel called to participate in the Great Commission in my community or globally?
  2. Transformation through Encounter:
    • How has my own encounter with God transformed my view of the world and my role in it?
    • How can I continue to seek and embrace these transformative encounters?
  3. Living Out the Commission:
    • What practical steps can I take to align my life more closely with the Great Commission?
    • How can I support others in their journeys of faith and discipleship?

Reflecting on these questions can help you draw deeper connections between the transformative vision of Isaiah and the call to mission in the Great Commission, enriching your spiritual life and sense of purpose.

How relevant to us is the story of Jonah?

What is really taking place is a spiritual battle that has been fought since the time of Abraham and his sons.

Supporting Scripture: Jonah 1:1-2

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Supporting Scripture: 2 Kings 14:23-25

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In the same way that Jesus, the Jewish Messiah, was sent by God to save both Jews and Gentiles, Jonah, the Jewish prophet, was sent by God to a Gentile nation from .

Supporting Scripture: Jonah 1:3

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Supporting Scripture: Jonah 1:17

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 12:38-41

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Jonah didn’t believe the people of Ninevah deserved God’s forgiveness.

Supporting Scripture: Jonah 3:5

Supporting Scripture: Jonah 3:10

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Supporting Scripture: Jonah 4:1-3

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Supporting Scripture: Jonah 4:11

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Here is what God thinks about the current situation in the Middle East: God wants Islamic Extremists to know Jesus Christ as and .

“And now it’s time for us to understand our season, our generation, how can we be faithful, how can we pray, how can we serve so that the impact will be even greater in the generations to come?”

The story of Jonah is God’s call to us, to you and me, to live out the so that even the least deserving will come to know the Good News of Jesus Christ.

 

Reflecting on Jonah 4:1-11 can provide profound insights into our attitudes, emotions, and relationship with God. Here are some personal reflection questions to consider:

Understanding Jonah’s Attitude

  1. Why was Jonah so angry at God’s decision to spare Nineveh?
    • Reflect on times when you have been upset with outcomes that didn’t align with your expectations. How did you respond?
  2. Jonah’s anger reveals a struggle with accepting God’s compassion towards others. Have you ever struggled with similar feelings towards people you deem undeserving of grace?
    • Consider how you view and treat those who you feel are undeserving of forgiveness or kindness.

Examining God’s Compassion

  1. God asked Jonah, “Is it right for you to be angry?” How do you think Jonah should have responded?
    • Think about how you react when confronted with questions that challenge your perspective or emotions.
  2. How do you perceive God’s compassionate nature, especially when it extends to those who are not like you or who have wronged you?
    • Reflect on how you can cultivate a more compassionate and forgiving attitude.

Self-Reflection and Personal Growth

  1. In the passage, God provides Jonah with a plant for shade, which Jonah is happy about, but then God takes it away. What does this teach you about your attachment to temporary comforts?
    • Examine areas in your life where you might be overly reliant on temporary comforts or blessings.
  2. Jonah’s reaction to the plant’s demise shows a concern for his own comfort over the well-being of others. In what ways do you prioritize your comfort over helping or showing compassion to others?
    • Identify opportunities where you can shift your focus from self-comfort to serving and loving others.

Aligning with God’s Perspective

  1. God highlights Jonah’s concern for the plant over his concern for the people of Nineveh. How can you align your priorities with God’s priorities?
    • Reflect on how you can develop a heart that prioritizes the things that matter to God, such as love, mercy, and justice.
  2. God’s patience and effort to teach Jonah shows His desire for us to understand His ways. How do you seek to understand and align yourself with God’s will in your life?
    • Consider the ways you can deepen your relationship with God and seek His guidance in your daily decisions.

Practical Application

  1. In what ways can you demonstrate God’s compassion and grace in your community or to specific individuals you may have previously overlooked?
    • Think of actionable steps you can take to extend compassion and grace to those around you, especially to those you find difficult to love.
  2. Reflecting on Jonah’s story, what changes can you make in your attitude or behavior to better reflect the character of God?
    • Identify specific areas in your life where you need to change and commit to making those adjustments to better mirror God’s love and mercy.

These questions can guide you in a deeper understanding of the passage and prompt meaningful personal growth.

Two important questions:

  1. What is the enemy’s strategy?
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  2. How do I conquer his strategy?
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Supporting Scripture: 1 Peter 5:8 (ESV)

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The enemy’s strategy has always been to get to .

The enemy’s strategy is to send you into an .

Supporting Scripture: 1 Kings 19:13-16 (ESV)

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The enemy wants to take what began as a faithful, fruitful walk with Jesus and turn it into a , , , existence.

One way the enemy tries to drive you into an early retirement is to send you the spirit of or .

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Supporting Scripture: 1 Kings 19:1-3 (ESV)

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FEAR is imagining a future where is .

We FEAR by realizing we have already with Christ and have been made in Him.

Supporting Scripture: Romans 8:31 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: 2 Timothy 1:6-7 (ESV)

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The second way the enemy tries to drive you into an early retirement is to send you the spirit of .

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Supporting Scripture: 1 Kings 11:1-4 (ESV)

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We conquer compromise by never our .

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The third way the enemy tries to drive you into an early retirement is to send you the spirit of .

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We conquer the spirit of prosperity by we have no thing from the Lord.

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Satan can’t make you … he can only try to you.

Satan can’t make you … he can only you.

Satan can’t make you choose things over God … he can only offer you

Supporting Scripture: 1 Peter 5:9 (ESV)

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Reflecting on 1 Kings 19:1-12 can be a profound experience, as it recounts the story of the prophet Elijah encountering God in a moment of despair and seeking refuge. Here are some personal reflection questions inspired by this passage:

  1. Have you ever experienced a moment of deep despair or exhaustion, similar to Elijah’s state when he fled from Jezebel’s threat?
  2. How do you typically respond to challenges or moments of crisis? Are you more inclined to retreat and isolate yourself, like Elijah, or do you tend to confront situations head-on?
  3. Consider Elijah’s feelings of isolation and loneliness as he journeyed to Mount Horeb. Have you ever felt alone in your struggles, despite being surrounded by others? How did you cope with those feelings?
  4. Reflect on the various ways in which God revealed Himself to Elijah during his time of need – through a gentle whisper rather than dramatic displays of power. Have you ever experienced God’s presence or guidance in unexpected or subtle ways?
  5. Elijah’s encounter with God on Mount Horeb brought him a renewed sense of purpose and direction. Are there moments in your life when you’ve felt a similar sense of clarity or reassurance after seeking God in times of uncertainty?
  6. Consider the significance of Elijah covering his face with his cloak before encountering God’s presence. What might this gesture symbolize in terms of reverence, humility, or awe? How do you approach moments of spiritual encounter or revelation in your own life?
  7. Reflect on the importance of silence and stillness in Elijah’s experience of hearing God’s voice. In your busy and noisy world, how do you create space for quiet reflection and listening for God’s voice?
  8. Elijah’s journey to Mount Horeb was both physical and spiritual. Are there places or environments that help you feel closer to God or provide a sense of refuge and solace during difficult times?
  9. Consider Elijah’s conversation with God, where he expressed his frustrations and fears. Do you feel comfortable being honest and vulnerable with God about your own struggles and doubts?
  10. Reflect on the ways in which this passage challenges your understanding of God’s presence and the nature of divine communication. How does Elijah’s experience resonate with your own journey of faith and seeking after God?

 

What kind of advice would you give our graduates today?

Above everything else as disciples of Jesus Christ, we need wisdom on how to be and .

Supporting Scripture: 1 Kings 2:1-3 (ESV)

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How do you live a life that is faithful and fruitful? You , , and -in the ways of God.

Supporting Scripture: 1 Kings 3:5 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: 1 Kings 3:9 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Isaiah 40:8 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Proverbs 3:1 (ESV)

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A faithful and fruitful life leads to of .

Supporting Scripture: Proverbs 3:2 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Proverbs 3:8 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Proverbs 3:16 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Proverbs 3:18 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Exodus 20:12 (ESV)

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What are you doing with your life that will outlive you?

A faithful and fruitful life leads to as well as .

Supporting Scripture: Proverbs 3:4 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 5:16 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: 1 Peter 2:12 (ESV)

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A faithful and fruitful life leads to .

Supporting Scripture: Proverbs 3:5-6 (ESV)

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Ask God for , and He will it.

Supporting Scripture: James 1:5 (ESV)

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Reflecting on Proverbs 3:1-18 can offer insights into wisdom, guidance, and the rewards of righteous living. Here are some personal reflection questions on this passage:

  1. **How do you interpret the importance of “not forgetting” the teachings and commands of wisdom? What practices help you keep wisdom at the forefront of your life?
  2. **Consider the promise of long life and prosperity for those who hold fast to wisdom. How do you see this principle reflected in your own experiences or observations?
  3. **Reflect on a time when you leaned on your own understanding rather than seeking God’s guidance. What were the outcomes, and what did you learn from that experience?
  4. **Think about the concept of trust in the Lord with all your heart. How do you cultivate trust in God in both the good times and the challenging moments of life?
  5. **In what ways do you acknowledge God in all your ways? How does this practice influence your decision-making process and your daily interactions with others?
  6. **Consider the image of wisdom as a tree of life. How does wisdom enrich and sustain your life, relationships, and endeavors?
  7. **Reflect on the idea of seeking wisdom as more valuable than seeking material wealth. How do you prioritize spiritual and moral growth in a world that often prioritizes material success?
  8. **Think about the relationship between discipline and love in this passage. How does God’s discipline reflect His love for you, and how do you receive and respond to His correction?
  9. **Reflect on the importance of humility in gaining wisdom. How do you maintain a humble attitude in your pursuit of knowledge and understanding?
  10. **Consider the role of joy and peace in the life of someone who walks in wisdom. How do you experience the joy and peace that come from living a life aligned with God’s wisdom and principles?

 

 

 

 

is a discipline that Jesus exercised most of his life.

Supporting Scripture: Joshua 3:1-8 (ESV)

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The first dynamic of prayer is that we need to in prayer.

Supporting Scripture: Acts 1:2-8 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Joshua 3:5 (ESV)

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God will .

Supporting Scripture: Psalm 84:11 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Philippians 2:9-10 (ESV)

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The second dynamic of prayer is to .

The third dynamic of prayer is .

Supporting Scripture: Joshua 3:5 (ESV)

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determines .

Supporting Scripture: Mark 6:6 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Mark 11:24 (ESV)

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Our faith in God’s answers to our prayers should be dictated by the BUT on .

The fourth dynamic of prayer is that we must on .

Supporting Scripture: Joshua 3:8 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Joshua 3:14-16 (ESV)

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Reflecting on Joshua 3:1-8 can offer profound insights into themes like faith, obedience, and leadership. Here are some personal reflection questions on this passage:

  1. **What significance does the crossing of the Jordan River hold for you personally? How does it relate to your own journey of faith or transition in life?
  2. **Reflect on a time when you faced an obstacle that seemed insurmountable. How did you respond? Did you trust in divine guidance as the Israelites did?
  3. **Consider the role of obedience in this passage. How do you discern between your own desires and what you believe to be God’s will for your life?
  4. **Think about Joshua’s leadership in this passage. What qualities of leadership do you see displayed, and how can you apply them in your own leadership roles or in following the leadership of others?
  5. **Reflect on the concept of preparation. In what ways do you prepare yourself spiritually, mentally, and emotionally for significant moments or challenges in your life?
  6. **How does the imagery of crossing the Jordan River resonate with your understanding of baptism or spiritual renewal?
  7. **Consider the symbolism of the Ark of the Covenant leading the way. What “Ark” represents God’s presence in your life, guiding and sustaining you through uncertainties?
  8. **Reflect on the importance of following instructions, even when they seem unconventional or difficult. How do you cultivate a spirit of obedience in your own life?
  9. **Think about the community aspect of this passage. How does the support of fellow believers contribute to your own spiritual journey?
  10. **Imagine yourself standing on the banks of the Jordan River with Joshua and the Israelites. What emotions and thoughts arise as you anticipate crossing into the promised land of God’s blessings and provision?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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