Have you every had a problem that seemingly could not be resolved?

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Supporting Scripture: 1 Samuel 1:1-6

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Elkanah is an .

Elkanah lives in the hill country of .

Elkanah is a who belongs to the family of worship leaders who minister at .

Supporting Scripture: 1 Chronicles 6:31-38

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Hannah takes her problem to the

Supporting Scripture: 1 Samuel 1:5

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HANNAH =

Supporting Scripture: 1 Samuel 1:12-15

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Supporting Scripture: Acts 2:12-13

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Supporting Scripture: 1 Samuel 1:16-17

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Supporting Scripture: Hebrews 4:14-16

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Supporting Scripture: Romans 8:34

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There is always that the answer, the resolution to our seemingly unresolvable problems, is on the verge of coming to pass through the intercessions of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Reflecting on the scripture found in 1 Samuel 1:9-18:

  1. How does Hannah’s interaction with Eli reflect the role of an intercessor?
  2. What similarities can be drawn between Hannah’s plea for a child and Jesus’ role as an intercessor for humanity?
  3. In what ways does Hannah’s fervent prayer and trust in God parallel the intercessory ministry of Jesus?
  4. How does Hannah’s commitment to keep her vow to God reflect Jesus’ commitment to intercede on behalf of believers?
  5. What insights can be gained about the nature of intercession from Hannah’s persistence and faithfulness in prayer?
  6. How does Hannah’s experience with Eli and her subsequent blessing align with the concept of Jesus as the ultimate mediator between God and humanity?
  7. In what ways does Hannah’s story foreshadow Jesus’ role as the perfect intercessor between God and humanity?
  8. Reflecting on Hannah’s situation, how does the concept of Jesus as an intercessor provide hope and assurance to believers today?
  9. What lessons can Christians learn from Hannah’s example in terms of their own role as intercessors for others?
  10. How does Hannah’s story prompt us to consider the importance of trusting in God’s timing and sovereignty, both in our prayers and in Jesus’ intercession for us?

 

 

 

Who is Jesus?

Have you ever felt forgotten, forsaken, pushed aside, betrayed, left-out, or disowned?

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Supporting Scripture: Ruth 1:1

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 1:1-6

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Supporting Scripture: Deuteronomy 23:3-4

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Supporting Scripture: Judges 3:5-7

Supporting Scripture: Ruth 1:20

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Supporting Scripture: Ruth 1:16-18

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How do we see Jesus in Boaz?

We see Jesus in the way Boaz Ruth.

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Supporting Scripture: Ruth 2:8-9

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We see Jesus in the way Boaz his bread and wine with Ruth.

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Supporting Scripture: Ruth 2:14

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Supporting Scripture: John 6:35

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We see Jesus in the way Boaz Ruth by marrying her.

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Supporting Scripture: Ruth 3:7

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Supporting Scripture: Ruth 4:7-10

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Jesus died so that we would in our dead state of sin, so that we could be , and that everything we’d lost to sin and death could be restored to us.

Reflecting on Jesus as redeemer through the lens of the story of Ruth and Boaz in Ruth 3:6-13 offers a rich opportunity to explore themes of redemption, provision, and the transformative power of love. Here are some personal reflection questions to consider or questions you might explore in your small group:

  1. Understanding Redemption: In this passage, Ruth approaches Boaz in the middle of the night, symbolizing her act of seeking redemption. Reflect on a time when you felt the need for redemption in your own life. How did you seek it, and how did you experience it?
  2. The Role of the Redeemer: Boaz serves as a redeemer figure in Ruth’s story, providing for her and Naomi in their time of need. In what ways do you see Jesus as your redeemer, providing for your spiritual needs and offering salvation?
  3. Trust and Obedience: Ruth obeys Naomi’s instructions and approaches Boaz with humility and trust. Reflect on a time when you were called to trust and obey, even when the path seemed uncertain. How did this experience deepen your faith or understanding of God’s provision?
  4. The Vulnerability of Redemption: Ruth’s act of approaching Boaz in the night could be seen as a vulnerable act. Reflect on the vulnerability inherent in seeking redemption and grace. How does this vulnerability shape your understanding of your relationship with Jesus as redeemer?
  5. Receiving Redemption: Boaz responds to Ruth’s request for redemption with kindness and generosity. Reflect on a time when you experienced unexpected grace or redemption. How did this experience shape your understanding of God’s love for you?
  6. The Role of Community: Naomi plays a crucial role in guiding Ruth toward redemption. Reflect on the role of community in your own spiritual journey. How have others helped guide you toward redemption and growth in your faith?
  7. The Generosity of the Redeemer: Boaz’s generosity toward Ruth goes beyond what is required by law, reflecting God’s abundant grace and love for His people. Reflect on the ways in which Jesus’s redemption exceeds our expectations and offers us more than we deserve.
  8. Living as Redeemed People: Ruth’s story doesn’t end with her redemption but continues as she becomes part of the lineage of Jesus. Reflect on how your own experience of redemption shapes the way you live and interact with others as a follower of Christ.
  9. Being a Redeemer to Others: Just as Boaz served as a redeemer to Ruth and Naomi, reflect on how you can embody the love and redemption of Jesus in the lives of those around you. How can you extend grace, kindness, and provision to others in need?

These questions can help you delve deeper into the themes of redemption and grace found in the story of Ruth and Boaz, leading to a richer understanding of Jesus as our ultimate redeemer.

 

Who are you going to serve in this life?

Supporting Scripture: Joshua 24:15 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Deuteronomy 30:15-20 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 7:13-14 (ESV)

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Am I on the right path?

Supporting Scripture: Colossians 1:13-14 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: John 20:27-31 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: John 14:6 (ESV)

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Easter faith is making the to the Lord of Life.

Closing Prayer:

Lord Jesus, I repent of my sin. I choose to follow You. I confess You as my Lord and Savior. I receive Your gift of eternal life. Amen.

 

Reflecting on Easter and the specific passage from John 20:24-30, which recounts the story of Doubting Thomas, offers a profound opportunity to explore your faith, doubts, and the nature of belief. Here are some personal reflection questions to consider:

  1. Encountering Doubt: Thomas doubted the resurrection of Jesus until he could see and touch Jesus’ wounds for himself. Reflect on a time when you experienced doubt in your faith or in an aspect of your life that was important to you. How did you address this doubt?
  2. The Role of Evidence in Faith: Thomas asked for physical proof of Jesus’ resurrection to believe. How do you reconcile the need for tangible evidence with the essence of faith, which Hebrews 11:1 describes as “confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see”?
  3. Jesus’ Response to Doubt: Jesus did not rebuke Thomas for his doubt but instead offered him the evidence he sought. How does this response shape your understanding of how to deal with doubt, either your own or that of others?
  4. Blessed Are Those Who Have Not Seen and Yet Have Believed: Jesus pronounced a blessing on those who believe without seeing. In what ways does this statement challenge or affirm your current faith journey?
  5. The Purpose of John’s Gospel: The passage concludes by stating that these things are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name. How does this purpose resonate with your personal journey of faith? How does it influence your understanding of the role of Scripture in faith?
  6. Faith in the Modern World: Considering the societal demand for empirical evidence and the scientific method, how do you navigate your faith in a world that often values what can be physically proven over what is believed?
  7. Personal Witness: Thomas’ experience transformed him from a doubter to a believer who traditionally is said to have spread the Gospel far and wide. How does your personal encounter with faith compel you to live differently or share your faith with others?
  8. The Community of Believers: Thomas learned of Jesus’ resurrection through his community, yet he struggled with belief until he had a personal encounter with Christ. How does this reflect the importance of community in your spiritual life, and how does it suggest you support others in their journey of faith?

Reflecting on these questions can deepen your understanding of your faith, your doubts, and how you interact with the unseen aspects of belief in Jesus Christ.

What does it really mean to love God?

What do you hear as the definition of agape love?

What would it mean for us to love God with agape love?

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 22:34-38 (ESV)

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We love God by His voice.

Supporting Scripture: Deuteronomy 8:3 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: John 10:1-5 (ESV)

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John 10: 27-30 (ESV)

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We love God by His commands.

Supporting Scripture: Deuteronomy 6:1-2 (ESV)

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God’s love language is

Supporting Scripture: John 14:15 (ESV)

Supporting Scripture: John 14:21 (ESV)

Supporting Scripture: John 15:10 (ESV)

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We love God by others to do the same.

Supporting Scripture: Deuteronomy 6:6-9 (ESV)

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We love God by His voice, His Word, and others to do the same.

Which of these three ways of loving Jesus do you need to focus on the most?

 

Reflecting on Deuteronomy 6:1-15, here are some personal reflection questions:

  1. Understanding the Covenant: How do you perceive your relationship with God as a covenant, as described in this passage? What responsibilities do you feel come with being part of this covenant?
  2. Teaching and Passing Down Faith: In what ways are you actively passing down your faith and knowledge of God to others, particularly the next generation, as instructed in verses 7-9?
  3. Internalizing God’s Commands: How deeply rooted are God’s commands in your heart and mind, as suggested in verse 6? What practices or habits do you employ to internalize these teachings?
  4. Guarding Against Idolatry: What are some modern-day “idols” that can distract you from wholeheartedly loving God? How do you actively guard against these distractions in your life?
  5. Remembering God’s Faithfulness: Reflect on instances where you have personally experienced God’s faithfulness and provision in your life. How do these experiences influence your trust and obedience to God?
  6. Gratitude and Contentment: Do you find contentment in what God has provided for you, or do you often desire more? How can you cultivate a spirit of gratitude, as opposed to coveting, in your life?
  7. Living in Reverence: In what ways do you demonstrate reverence and awe for God in your daily life? Are there areas where you can grow in your reverence for Him?
  8. Balancing Fear and Love: How do you balance the fear of God with the love of God in your life? How does this balance impact your relationship with Him and with others?
  9. Responding to Trials: Reflect on how you respond to trials and challenges in your life. Do these situations draw you closer to God, or do they lead you away from Him?
  10. Application of Scripture: How do you apply the principles and teachings found in Deuteronomy 6:1-15 to your everyday life? Are there specific areas where you can improve in living out these truths? What is one thing you can do to love Jesus more fully?

These questions can help you delve deeper into the passage and its implications for your life, fostering personal growth and spiritual development.

Why is God so displeased with Moses?

Supporting Scripture: Numbers 20:2 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Numbers 20:6 (ESV)

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When is the last time you fell on your face before God in prayer?

Supporting Scripture: Numbers 20:7-8 (ESV)

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Take the

Assemble the

Tell the

Supporting Scripture: Exodus 17:1-2, 5-6 (ESV)

Is there a difference between and ?

Supporting Scripture: 1 Corinthians 10:4 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Numbers 20:10-11 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Exodus 15:22-26 (ESV)

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We are never to allow our anger to boil over to the point that we , , and call what God has , , and .

Supporting Scripture: Matthew 5:21-24 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: James 3:6, 9-10 (ESV)

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Reflecting on Numbers 20:1-13, which recounts the story of Moses striking the rock to bring forth water, here are some reflection questions that you should consider asking yourself or discussing in your LifeGroup:

  1. Understanding the Context:
    • What was the situation of the Israelites at this point in the narrative?
    • How had God provided for them previously, and what were their current concerns?
  2. Moses’ Actions:
    • What motivated Moses to strike the rock instead of speaking to it as God commanded?
    • How do you think Moses’ frustration and anger influenced his actions?
  3. God’s Response:
    • How did God react to Moses’ actions? Why do you think God responded the way He did?
    • What do you learn about God’s expectations from this incident?
  4. Lessons on Obedience:
    • What does this story teach us about the importance of obedience to God’s commands, even in challenging situations?
    • How can we ensure that we respond obediently to God’s instructions in our own lives?
  5. Dealing with Frustration and Anger:
    • Have you ever experienced a situation where frustration or anger led you to act contrary to God’s will?
    • How can we manage our emotions in difficult circumstances to ensure that we remain obedient to God?
  6. Trusting in God’s Provision:
    • Reflecting on how God provided water despite Moses’ disobedience, what does this teach us about God’s faithfulness and provision?
    • How can we strengthen our trust in God’s provision in our own lives, even when circumstances seem dire?
  7. Leadership and Responsibility:
    • What lessons can leaders draw from Moses’ actions in this passage?
    • How can leaders ensure they lead with humility, obedience, and reliance on God rather than acting out of frustration or pride?
  8. Application to Daily Life:
    • What is one thing you can do to apply the lessons from this passage to your daily life and interactions with others?
    • What practical step can you take to cultivate obedience, trust, and humility in your relationship with God and others?
  9. Prayer and Reflection:
    • Take some time to pray alone or with someone else, asking God for forgiveness for times when you have acted contrary to His will, and seeking His guidance to grow in obedience, trust, and humility

If you have any questions about today’s sermon or need to ask for prayer, please find the connection card on your screen and submit a question or prayer.

 

Has anyone ever imparted something of value to you?

To impart means to or to something to another person.

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Something that we are missing in the church today is a Biblical understanding of

Impartation is when transfers the anointing or the gifts or even the presence of the from one disciple to another.

Supporting Scripture: Numbers 11:4-6 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Numbers 11:10-12 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Numbers 11:16-17, 24-25 (ESV)

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What does this teach us about the Spirit of God?

The Spirit is God in operation. – Dr. Robert Coleman

Supporting Scripture: Numbers 11:26-29 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Deuteronomy 34:9 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: 2 Kings 2:9-15 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: John 20:19-23 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Acts 13:2-5 (ESV)

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All believers are sealed, indwelt, and experience the sanctifying grace of the Spirit in them. But not every believer is, at the time of the new birth or even later, necessarily filled or controlled by the Holy Spirit. The filling of which we speak is certainly the believer’s birthright. It belongs to him or her because he or she is a child of God and a joint heir with Jesus Christ. It is the Father’s wish that all of His children be filled with the Spirit. It is a blessing that must be claimed. – Dr. Harold Lindsell

Are you filled with the Holy Spirit?

Here are some reflection questions on Numbers 11:16-30 and the impartation of the Holy Spirit:

  1. In Numbers 11:16-30, we see Moses sharing the burden of leadership with seventy elders. Reflect on a time when you shared a responsibility with others. How did it feel to collaborate and share the load?
  2. The Holy Spirit descended upon the seventy elders, empowering them to prophesy. How do you understand the role of the Holy Spirit in empowering individuals for their tasks and responsibilities?
  3. Consider the reaction of Eldad and Medad, who prophesied in the camp even though they were not present at the initial gathering. How does their example challenge our understanding of spiritual experiences?
  4. Moses expressed a desire for all of God’s people to be prophets. Reflect on the idea that prophethood is not limited to a select few but is available to all believers. How does this perspective influence your understanding of your own spiritual journey?
  5. The Spirit’s work was not confined to the designated meeting place but manifested in the midst of the Israelite camp. How does this emphasize the omnipresence and accessibility of the Holy Spirit in our lives?
  6. Reflect on the significance of Joshua’s concern about Eldad and Medad’s prophesying outside the tent. How might our preconceived notions or structures limit the work of the Holy Spirit among us?
  7. Consider the response of Moses when Joshua expressed concern. How does Moses’ attitude toward the work of the Spirit challenge us to embrace diversity and unexpected expressions of faith within our communities?
  8. Reflect on a time when you experienced the presence or work of the Holy Spirit in a way that was unexpected or unconventional. How did this experience deepen your understanding of God’s nature and your relationship with Him?
  9. How can we cultivate a greater sensitivity to the leading of the Holy Spirit in our lives and communities, enabling us to embrace diversity and foster unity in the body of Christ?
  10. In what ways can we encourage and support one another in stepping out in faith and allowing the Holy Spirit to work through us, even in situations where it may challenge traditional norms or structures?

How does idolatry begin?

Supporting scripture: Exodus 20:3 (ESV)

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Supporting scripture: Exodus 20:4-5 (ESV)

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The answer is

Supporting scripture: Exodus 32:1 (ESV)

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Supporting scripture: Exodus 24:17-18 (ESV)

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Supporting scripture: Exodus 20:2 (ESV)

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Where were they going?

Where are they presently?

Your impatience can turn you from worshiping God and turn you a god you think is and will get you more to where you think you want to go.

Supporting scripture: Matthew 13:22 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Exodus 32:2 (ESV)

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Supporting scripture: Exodus 32:4 (ESV)

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Our idolatry not only puts us in danger, it puts future generations in spiritual danger as well.

Supporting scripture: 1 Kings 12:26-30 (ESV)

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Have you made an idol of any person or any thing?

Here are some reflection questions about the concept of making idols in modern times:

  1. What is your understanding of the term “idol” in a modern context?
  2. In what ways do you think society creates idols today? (e.g., celebrities, material possessions, ideologies) How do you create idols?
  3. How do you personally define success, and do you think society’s definition of success contributes to idolization?
  4. Reflecting on social media and influencer culture, do you believe it fosters idolization? Why or why not?
  5. Can idolization have negative impacts on individuals and society? If so, what are some examples?
  6. How can we differentiate between healthy admiration and idolization?
  7. What role do you think consumerism plays in the creation of modern idols?
  8. What step can you take to avoid falling into the trap of idolization?
  9. How can communities and institutions promote values that discourage idolization and encourage healthier forms of admiration and inspiration?

These questions can serve as a starting point for a fruitful discussion on the topic of making idols in modern times.

 

 

Supporting Scripture: Exodus 12:22 (ESV)

Is partial obedience acceptable to God?

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Supporting Scripture: Daniel 5:2-4 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Daniel 5:5 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Daniel 5:25-28 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Daniel 5:30-31 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Psalm 19:7-8 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 5:17 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Malachi 4:4 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Mark 12:30-31 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Romans 13:10 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Romans 3:31 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Exodus 20:3 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 6:24 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: James 2:10 (ESV)

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Here are some reflection questions suitable for personal reflections or LifeGroup discussions about the Ten Commandments:

  1. Personal Reflection:
    • Which of the Ten Commandments resonates with you the most, and why?
    • Have you ever struggled to follow any of the commandments? If so, which one(s) and what were the circumstances?
  2. Relevance Today:
    • How do you see the principles of the Ten Commandments being applied (or neglected) in modern society?
    • Are there any commandments that you believe are particularly challenging for people to follow in today’s world? Why?
  3. Relationship with God:
    • How do the first four commandments help shape our relationship with God?
    • In what ways can we deepen our commitment to honoring God in our daily lives, as outlined in the commandments?
  4. Relationships with Others:
    • How do the last six commandments guide our interactions and relationships with others?
    • What practical steps can we take to live out the principles of love, respect, and integrity in our relationships?
  5. Community Impact:
    • How might society be different if everyone adhered to the principles of the Ten Commandments?
    • As a small group, what actions or initiatives can we take to promote the values of the commandments in our community?
  6. Cultural and Moral Shifts:
    • Do you think the relevance and significance of the Ten Commandments have changed over time? Why or why not?
    • How can we navigate cultural and moral shifts while remaining faithful to the timeless truths conveyed in the commandments?
  7. Personal Growth:
    • What steps can we take individually to align our lives more closely with the principles of the Ten Commandments?
    • How can accountability and support aid in our obedience to God’s commandments?
  8. Grace and Forgiveness:
    • How does the concept of grace intersect with our understanding of the commandments and our ability to follow them?
    • How can we extend grace and forgiveness to ourselves and others when we fall short of living up to the standards set by the commandments?

These questions can serve as a starting point for meaningful discussions within your small group, fostering introspection, mutual encouragement, and a deeper understanding of God’s principles for righteous living.

 

What do you stake your life upon?

The only thing you can stake your life upon is the of .

Supporting Scripture: Genesis 4:1-5 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Genesis 8:15-21 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Genesis 22:1-2 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Matthew 3:16-17 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Exodus 12:12 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Exodus 12:3-7 (ESV)

Supporting Scripture: Exodus 12:13 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Hebrews 9:22 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: John 1:29 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: 2 Corinthians 5:21 (ESV)

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Supporting Scripture: Exodus 12:22 (ESV)

Here are some small group discussion questions about Exodus 12:1-13, which covers the institution of the Passover:

  1. What significance does the Passover hold in the history of the Israelites? How does this event mark a pivotal moment in their liberation from slavery in Egypt?
  2. In Exodus 12:3-6, specific instructions are given regarding the selection and preparation of the Passover lamb. What do these instructions symbolize or foreshadow?
  3. Reflecting on Exodus 12:7-10, why do you think the blood of the lamb was to be applied to the doorposts of the Israelites’ houses? What does this act represent?
  4. In Exodus 12:11-13, the Lord gives detailed instructions on how the Passover meal is to be eaten. What is the significance of eating the meal in haste, with loins girded, sandals on feet, and staff in hand?
  5. How does the Passover in Exodus 12 point forward to Jesus Christ? How is Jesus the ultimate fulfillment of the Passover lamb?
  6. How might the concept of the Passover lamb apply to our lives today? How does it speak to us about themes of redemption, sacrifice, and salvation?
  7. Discuss the idea of obedience in the Passover narrative. What can we learn about obedience to God’s instructions from the Israelites’ response to the Passover command?
  8. In what ways does the Passover serve as a reminder for the Israelites to remember God’s faithfulness and deliverance? How can we cultivate a similar spirit of remembrance in our own lives?
  9. How does the Passover event in Exodus 12 challenge our understanding of God’s justice and mercy?
  10. In your opinion, what lessons or applications can we draw from Exodus 12:1-13 for our Christian faith journey today?

These questions can foster deep discussion and reflection on the spiritual and theological themes present in Exodus 12:1-13.

 

When you think about suffering, what comes to mind? Do you envision bedraggled children with distended stomachs, a hospital patient hooked up to life-sustaining medical equipment, or a courageous veteran dealing with the aftermath of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.  Adversity seems to be a common denominator to human existence, but what does the Bible have to say about suffering?

Jesus spoke to His disciples about suffering. One of the most well-known verses reads, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me” (Matthew 16:24 ESV). The Greek word for cross in this verse is staurós. It refers to the crossbeam which the lowest criminals carried as they trudged toward their execution. The cross symbolized degradation and indescribable pain as well as sacrifice.

While the invitation to eternal life is free, it comes at a price–certain suffering.

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