Digging Deeper Week of March 11th

March 10, 2024   /   First Baptist Church Elgin

Day 1

Read: Isaiah 53:7

Background:

In this prophetic passage, Isaiah describes the suffering servant, who we understand to be Jesus Christ. The servant is portrayed as a lamb led to slaughter, silent and submissive in his suffering. This powerful imagery points to Christ’s sacrificial death on the cross.

Key words/ideas:

– Lamb (seh): a young sheep, used for sacrifice (Strong’s H7716)
– Slaughter (tebach): to slaughter, slay, butcher (Strong’s H2874)

Key theological ideas:

– The suffering servant in Isaiah 53 is a clear prophecy of Christ’s sacrificial death (Grudem, p. 540).
– Jesus’ silence in the face of his suffering demonstrates his willingness to be the sacrificial lamb (Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Isaiah 53:7).

Questions for reflection:

1. Why do you think Isaiah used the imagery of a lamb to describe the suffering servant?


2. How does Christ’s willingness to suffer silently challenge you in your own trials?


3. In what ways does this prophecy deepen your understanding of Jesus as the Lamb of God?

Apply it:

Spend time meditating on the imagery of Jesus as a lamb led to slaughter, thanking him for his willingness to suffer for your sake.

 

Day 2

Read: Genesis 3:1-7

Background:

In this passage, we see the temptation and fall of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. The serpent deceives Eve, causing her to doubt God’s goodness and leading both her and Adam to disobey God’s command. This act of rebellion brings sin and death into the world.

Key words/ideas:

– Serpent (nachash): a snake, symbolizing Satan (Strong’s H5175)
– Deceived (nasha’): to beguile, deceive (Strong’s H5377)

Key theological ideas:

– The fall of humanity in Genesis 3 introduces sin and death into the world, necessitating a savior (Grudem, p. 490).
– Satan’s deception and the human choice to disobey God result in the corruption of God’s perfect creation (Bible Knowledge Commentary, Genesis 3:1-7).

Questions for reflection:

1. How does the serpent’s deception lead Eve to doubt God’s goodness?


2. In what ways do you see the consequences of Adam and Eve’s sin in the world today?


3. How does understanding the fall in Genesis 3 highlight your need for Jesus, the Lamb of God?

Apply it:

Identify a specific area where you are prone to doubt God’s goodness, and pray for faith to trust in his provision and love.

 

Day 3

Read: Genesis 3:8-13

Background:

After Adam and Eve eat from the forbidden tree, they hear God walking in the garden and hide from him. When God questions them, they respond with fear, shame, and blame-shifting. This passage reveals the immediate relational consequences of their sin.

Key words/ideas:

– Hide (chaba’): to withdraw, hide (Strong’s H2244)
– Shame (buwsh): to be ashamed, disconcerted, disappointed (Strong’s H954)

Key theological ideas:

– Sin breaks the intimate relationship between God and humanity, causing shame and fear (Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Genesis 3:8-13).
– The blame-shifting of Adam and Eve is a picture of humanity’s tendency to avoid responsibility for sin (Grudem, p. 491).

Questions for reflection:

1. How do you see the effects of shame and fear in Adam and Eve’s response to God?


2. In what ways do you try to hide from God or shift blame when you sin?


3. How does understanding the relational consequences of sin emphasize your need for reconciliation through Christ?

Apply it:

Confess any areas of sin in your life where you have been hiding from God or shifting blame, and ask for his forgiveness and restoration.

 

Day 4

Read: Genesis 3:14-24

Background:

In response to Adam and Eve’s sin, God pronounces judgments on the serpent, Eve, and Adam. These judgments include enmity between the serpent and the woman’s offspring, enmity between Adam and Eve, pain in childbirth, and toil in work. However, even in the midst of these consequences, God provides a hint of redemption and grace.

Key words/ideas:

– Offspring (zera’): seed, descendant (Strong’s H2233)
– Bruise (shuwph): to crush, strike, gape upon (Strong’s H7779)

Key theological ideas:

– God’s judgment on the serpent in Genesis 3:15 is the first messianic prophecy, pointing to Christ’s ultimate victory over Satan (Grudem, p. 541).
– God’s provision of clothing for Adam and Eve is an act of grace, foreshadowing the redemption to come through Christ (Bible Knowledge Commentary, Genesis 3:21).

Questions for reflection:

1. How does the promise in Genesis 3:15 offer hope in the midst of the consequences of sin?


2. In what ways do you see God’s grace demonstrated in this passage?


3. How does understanding the far-reaching effects of sin highlight your need for a savior?

Apply it:

Thank God for his grace in providing a way of redemption through Jesus, even in the midst of the consequences of sin.

 

Day 5

Read: Genesis 22

Background:

In this chapter, God tests Abraham by asking him to sacrifice his beloved son, Isaac. Abraham obeys, trusting that God will provide. As he is about to sacrifice Isaac, God intervenes and provides a ram as a substitute. This event foreshadows God’s ultimate provision of Jesus as the sacrificial lamb.

Key words/ideas:

– Test (nasah): to test, try, prove (Strong’s H5254)
– Provide (ra’ah): to see, appear, consider (Strong’s H7200)

Key theological ideas:

– Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice Isaac is a picture of God’s willingness to sacrifice his own Son (Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Genesis 22).
– The ram provided as a substitute for Isaac points to Jesus, the ultimate substitute for sinners (Grudem, p. 540).

Questions for reflection:

1. How does Abraham’s obedience in this passage challenge you in your own faith journey?


2. In what ways do you see God’s provision in this story?


3. How does understanding the substitutionary sacrifice in this passage deepen your appreciation for Jesus as the Lamb of God?

Apply it:

Identify an area of your life where you need to trust God’s provision, and take a step of faith in obedience to him.

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